Category Archives: Healthy diet

What to Do About Unintentional Weight Loss in Older Adults

It often points to underlying health problems that deserve attention (Photo credit: Adobe Stock)

By Leslie Kernisan, MD for Next Avenue

One of my readers recently sent in this question:

Q: My 88-year-old father lives in his own home about 100 miles from us. He’s been living alone since my mother died five years ago. I thought he looked rather thin last time we saw him. I’m starting to feel worried about his nutrition. Should I be concerned? Would you recommend he start drinking a supplement such as Boost or Ensure?

A: This question comes up a lot for families. It is indeed very common for older adults to experience unintentional weight loss at some point in late life. read more

Fun Ways to Burn Off Thanksgiving Dinner

Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings

Here’s how you can balance out the caloric overload on Turkey Day. Photo credit: Thinkstock

By Linda Melone for Next Avenue

Between the turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and miles of pies, the average American eats between 3,000 and 4,500 calories on Thanksgiving Day. Considering that the typical, moderately-active woman needs approximately 1,800 calories a day and the average man needs between 2,200 and 2,400, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, that’s nearly two days worth of calories in a single meal!

The key to keeping things under control consists of limiting yourself to just that one day, says Tom Holland, author of Swim, Bike, Run –Eat: The Complete Guide to Fueling Your Triathlon. “It’s the one time of the year you should be able to eat what you want without counting calories. But it’s a good idea to plan activities both before and after dinner to burn off at least some of it,” notes Holland. read more

3 Recipes to Capture the Flavors of Fall

Here are 3 recipes that wrap fall’s flavors in wonderfully-scented, warming-to-the-soul baked treats. (Photo courtesy of CulinaryHill.com)

These easy, tasty recipes will warm your body and soul

By Meggan Hill for Next Avenue

Just as autumn has a traditional color palette, classic tastes are also associated with the season: rich pumpkin, tart cranberry, comforting apple and distinctive cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger.

The three recipes below wrap fall’s flavors in wonderfully-scented, warming-to-the-soul baked treats.

Enjoy!

Double Ginger Cookies



Photo courtesy of CulinaryHill.com

Ingredients

2 ¼ c. flour
2 tsp. ground ginger
1 tsp. baking soda
¾ tsp. ground cinnamon
½ tsp. ground cloves
¼ tsp. salt
¾ c. butter
1 c. + 2 T. sugar
1 egg
2 T. crystallized ginger, finely chopped
¼ c. molasses
1 T. water
read more

11 Ways to Increase Your Energy

Vitality doesn’t come in pills. You have to change your daily habits.

By Jonny Bowden, Ph.D. for Next Avenue

In the commencement address he gave to graduates of Kenyon College in 2005, award-winning novelist David Foster Wallace talked about fish:

Two young fish are swimming along when they happen to meet an older fish swimming in the opposite direction. The older fish nods at them and says: ‘Morning, boys. How’s the water?’ The two young fish swim on for a bit. Eventually one of them looks over at the other and says, ‘What the hell is water?’

That was Wallace’s example of how when something is always present in your life, you don’t notice it. Well, it’s the same for energy. Much like the water in Wallace’s parable, energy is something you take for granted — until you don’t have it. What’s more, you can’t get it, at least not in the traditional sense. Trying to do so is like trying to grasp water in your hand: It just slips through your fingers and splatters on the ground. However, if you cup your palm, water can sit in it, unperturbed. read more

Caffeinated or Not, Coffee May Help You Live Longer

New research provides more good news for those who love their java

By Rita Rubin for Next Avenue

Man satisfyingly sips coffee from a mug while sitting outside with an open laptop

Two new, large studies found that people who drank even a single cup of coffee a day lived longer than people who didn’t drink any coffee. [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

Two recent large studies suggest it might have been coffee that bubbled from the fountain of youth.

Both studies, one conducted in the United States, one across 10 European countries, found that people who drank even a single cup of coffee a day — decaf and/or caffeinated — lived longer than people who didn’t drink any coffee.

The effects were modest; compared to non-coffee drinkers, those who quaffed the most in the U.S. study, four or more cups a day, had an 18 percent lower risk of dying by its end. But given that half of U.S. adults drink coffee every day, the impact on the population could be substantial. read more

What’s Better for You: Butter or Margarine? Red Wine or White?

Here’s the latest research on smart food choices as we age

By Maureen Callahan for Next Avenue

A bit of butter or margarine in the shape of a heart, melting in a teflon-coated pan

Take a deeper look at the current line of thinking on 4 popular food duels. [Photo credit: Adobe Stock]

In the world of nutrition, certain debates seem to ping pong back and forth. Like the issue of butter vs. margarine. Or the battle between coffee and tea. It all starts when a new study comes along that seems to give a leg up to one food choice above the other. So the debate over healthy food choices marches on.

Here’s a deeper look at the current line of thinking on four of these popular food duels:

Bone Broth vs. Stock

With the Paleo diet movement and athletes like Kobe Bryant singing the praises of bone broth, you might be ready to ditch the homemade stock. But when culinary experts at Bon Appetit magazine turned to bone broth guru and chef Marco Canora, he told them that technically, bone broth is stock. read more

Are you getting enough protein? Too much?

How obsessing over protein could be harmful to your health

By Rashelle Brown for Next Avenue

Getting-Enough-Protein-web

Credit: Thinkstock

If you’re like me, you often find yourself confused by how many health headlines contradict one another. Lately, I’ve found this to be true where protein is concerned, particularly the protein needs of adults aged 50 and over.

In one study, published Jan. 1, 2015, in the American Journal of Physiology’s Endocrinology and Metabolism, scientists split 20 adults aged 52 to 75 into one group that consumed the U.S. RDA recommended level of protein, and another group that consumed double that amount, measuring levels of whole body protein at the beginning and end of the trial. While both groups maintained a positive protein balance (their bodies synthesized more protein than they broke down), the higher protein group ended up with a higher overall protein balance than the lower protein group. The news media jumped all over this, proclaiming that older adults should double their protein intake if they want to live long, healthy lives. read more

Lighten up your favorite recipes of yesteryear

You don’t have to give up all the flavor if you use a “sliding scale of decadence”

By Joanna Pruess for Next Avenue

Scalloped-Potatoes

Do you long to eat favorite foods from your youth without a side order of guilt? With creative tweaking, chocolaty brownies, creamy scalloped potatoes, hearty meatloaf, green bean-mushroom casserole with fried onions and other comfort foods can return from the list of no-nos. The key is determining which diet-wrecking ingredients you’re willing to compromise on and how much you’re willing to cut back on them. But the choices aren’t black or white: I think of them as existing on a sliding scale of decadence. read more

Can we delay aging?

Research on animals suggests we could improve humans’ healthy lifespan

By Felipe Sierra for Next Avenue

Credit: Thinkstock

Credit: Thinkstock

Editor’s note: This article is part of Next Avenue’s 2015 Influencers in Aging project honoring 50 people changing how we age and think about aging.

No, we cannot “prevent aging”… but what if we could delay it?

Unfortunately, the deterioration that comes with aging is part of a fundamental aspect of the universe, so it cannot be eliminated. Recent research suggests, however, that the rate of deterioration is indeed malleable, at least in many different animal models. So why not in people? read more

7 steps to healthier barbecue

Here’s how to make the best Fourth of July cookout ever

By Maureen Callahan for Next Avenue

HealthierBBQ-GettyImages-web

Credit: Getty Images

It may be the favorite way to cook on hot summer days, but experts say the high heat of grilling can produce cancer-causing compounds that are dangerous to your health.

But with the 4th of July nearing, don’t ditch the barbecue just yet. Grilling can still be one of the healthiest methods of cooking, as long as you use the right techniques and make healthy food choices.